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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 129-130

To assess the prevalence of dental caries and to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life in cleft lip and palate patient


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication7-Aug-2019

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, P.O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jclpca.jclpca_3_19

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. To assess the prevalence of dental caries and to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life in cleft lip and palate patient. J Cleft Lip Palate Craniofac Anomal 2019;6:129-30

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. To assess the prevalence of dental caries and to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life in cleft lip and palate patient. J Cleft Lip Palate Craniofac Anomal [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 21];6:129-30. Available from: http://www.jclpca.org/text.asp?2019/6/2/129/264096

Sir,

I read with interest the case–control study by Reche et al.[1] published in January–June 2019 issue of the Journal of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies. The authors assessed the prevalence of dental caries and evaluated the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) in Vidarbha region, India. They found that the patients with bilateral CLP experienced more difficulty while eating, speaking, smiling, and maintaining social contact as compared to the control group pointing out to the negative impact of CLP on the QoL and OHRQoL of the patients.[1] I assume that such results ought to be cautiously taken owing to the presence of the following methodological limitation. In the methodology, the authors mentioned the protocol of assessing OHRQoL in the studied cohort. They obviously addressed that the “dental impact on daily living instrument was used to collect data on the state of OHRQoL of the volunteers who were able to answer the questions offered. Patients were asked to answer the questions based on the events that occurred in the last 6 months. This instrument consists of ten questions which were divided into eight criteria that is, eating, speaking, tooth brushing, sleeping, smiling, emotional status, carrying out work, and enjoying social contact. For each question, the answer was given in oral impact on daily performance scale (no problem, mild problem, moderate problem, and severe problem with values ranging from 0 to 3).“[1] However, the authors did not mention the name of that instrument and its reference. It is obvious that there are many instruments to evaluate OHRQoL, namely Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale, Child Oral Health Impact Profile, Child Perception Questionnaires (CPQ), Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performance index, Oral Health-related Early Childhood Quality of Life (OH-ECQOL), and Parental-Caregiver Perceptions Questionnaire (P-CPQ-16). Various populations-specific OHRQoL instruments have been developed and validated to be employed in the clinical setting and researches.[2],[3] Interestingly, OH-ECQOL instrument for measuring OHRQoL in Indian children has been constructed and validated.[4] I assume that if Reche et al.[1] employed Indian population- specific OH-ECQOL instrument in the study methodology, more precise results on the OHRQoL status of the studied CLP patients might be obtained. Despite that limitation, the results of Reche et al.'s study[1] coincided with the published systematic review and meta-analysis, revealing that the presence of CLP negatively affects the OoL and OHRQoL, mainly on psychosocial dimensions.[5] Hence, adoption of strict strategies of psychosocial supportive programs to improve the QoL and OHRQoL in CLP patients deems pertinent.

 
  References Top

1.
Reche AM, Chordiya SD, Joshi SP, Bhumbre NS, Jadhav SK, Dhange NP. To assess the prevalence of dental caries and to evaluate oral health-related quality of life in cleft lip and palate patient. J Cleft Lip Palate Craniofac Anom 2019;6:38-42.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Aravena PC, Gonzalez T, Oyarzún T, Coronado C. Oral health-related quality of life in children in Chile treated for cleft lip and palate: A case-control approach. Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2017;54:e15-20.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Khoun T, Malden PE, Turton BJ. Oral health-related quality of life in young Cambodian children: A validation study with a focus on children with cleft lip and/or palate. Int J Paediatr Dent 2018;28:326-34.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Mathur VP, Dhillon JK, Logani A, Agarwal R. Development and validation of oral health-related early childhood quality of life tool for North Indian preschool children. Indian J Dent Res 2014;25:559-66.  Back to cited text no. 4
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5.
Queiroz Herkrath AP, Herkrath FJ, Rebelo MA, Vettore MV. Measurement of health-related and oral health-related quality of life among individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2015;52:157-72.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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