• Users Online: 43
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Partners Subscribe Contacts Login 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 4-10

Diagnosis and management of velopharyngeal insufficiency following cleft palate repair


1 Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA
2 Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine; Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Correspondence Address:
Arun K Gosain
Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 E Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2348-2125.126536

Rights and Permissions

Background: Cleft lip and palate repair seeks to restore normal form, improve feeding and achieve normal speech, which requires velopharyngeal competence. The absence of this ability, termed velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), is seen in a wide range of patients following primary cleft palate repair. This review article focuses on patient assessment and the surgical management of VPI. Recent trends and future directions in management are also presented. After reading, one should be able to describe the various treatment approaches for a patient with suspected VPI. Materials and Methods: A PubMed search was conducted using the following search terms: VPI, velopharygneal incompetence, VPI, velopharynx, velopharyngeal port, velopharyngeal mechanism, veloplasty, intravelar veloplasty and hypernasal speech. Relevant manuscripts were identified by abstract review and additional articles selected based on bibliography review. Articles were restricted to those in the English language. A total of 88 articles were selected for further review. Conclusions: VPI is a common complication following primary palatoplasty. The decision to operate, as well as the selection of operative procedure, depends on a multimodal patient assessment, including speech evaluation and imaging studies of the pharyngeal mechanism. A thorough understanding of velopharyngeal anatomy and physiology is crucial to understanding the deficits in patients with VPI as well as the myriad methods of surgical correction. While many techniques are available, there are no conclusive data to guide procedure choice and newer techniques of imaging and treating patients with VPI continue to evolve.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6800    
    Printed224    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded567    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal